Geographic Information Systems     Cultural Resources     Art+Design   
“In 1854, John Snow depicted a cholera outbreak in London using points to represent the locations of some individual cases, possibly the earliest use of the geographic method.”

GIS as an Information Management Tool

Geographic Information Systems

Consisting of primary, secondary, and tertiary GIS data source provide the ability to compile, digitize, download and overlaid in the same coordinate system. Managing these different data layers provided key abilities to identify and interpret features and localities in a large volume otherwise not necessarily is possible without the use of GIS.

For my heritage projects, the Information Management aspect of GIS allowed coordinating the point locations of artifacts and features with structural remains, ground and aerial photographs, historical maps and descriptions, and above all the more complex analytical and interpretative surfaces. The most common outputs of providing this information data are maps.

This information visualization capability of converting hundreds of lines of written data into symbols with situated aspect makes it a perfect outreach tool. The mapping projects gave me a great opportunity to explore this aspect of GIS.

  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool
  • GIS as Information Tool

GIS as an Analytical Tool

Geographic Information Systems

“Any record made will only be of lasting value if knowledge, observation and analytical intelligence have been brought to bear. Questions must be asked, hypotheses constructed and answers sought. The results must then be presented in a form which others can test; a process analogous to that of the natural scientist. Without analysis we have a mere inventory of phenomena." - John Bold Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England

In my projects I have also been using GIS as a tool for analyzing complex spatial data, reconstructing environments, and creating overlaying surfaces which present spatial information, helpful in effective decision making, especially in Cultural Resource Analysis.

The ability of GIS to interpolate artifact and feature densities, query/ correlate datasets and combine or extract data is very powerful. This enables us to present it in a spatial overlay with surface attributes and adds tremendously to the opportunities for reconstructing and identifying past behaviors. Combining this past information with the present helped making thoughtful decisions about sites future.

  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool
  • GIS as an Analytical Tool

GIS as a Cognitive Tool

Geographic Information Systems

Interpretive analysis and predictive modeling amongst others are the cognitive characteristics of GIS. One such example of the predictive modeling is its use in risk assessment through deterministic and probabilistic models.

“Risk Analysis for Cultural Resource of Snoqualmie Valley” was one such project where I creatively used GIS tools, my preservation experience and research into risk assessment models to provide analysis that help identify endangered cultural resource in that area.

View Slideshow [at] slideshare.net

In one other project, using interpretive analysis I built an independent framework that represented the cognitive perspective of the people who actually created cultural material.

This required deep rooted analysis about not only how people used environment in past, but how their ideas and behavior were influenced by how they envisioned their environment to be, and how those ideas and behaviors changed over time.

  • GIS as a Cognitive Tool
  • GIS as a Cognitive Tool
  • GIS as a Cognitive Tool
  • GIS as a Cognitive Tool

GIS for City Management

Geographic Information Systems

Working with City of SeaTac, provided me rich experience to understand role of GIS in city management, specifically as a support tool for land management. Researching the existing database models and implemented models give an opportunity to explore the reusable aspect of GIS.

Other projects for public works and finance department provided me insights into more technical aspect of GIS. The focus was specifically on network analysis for city storm water and transportation management systems and use of GIS to prioritize pavement reconstruction and capital improvement projects.

arrowUtility and transportation Database Research Project

  • Invites
  • GIS for City Management
  • GIS for City Management
  • GIS for City Management
  • GIS for City Management
  • GIS for City Management
  • GIS for City Management
  • GIS for City Management
  • GIS for City Management